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    July 31, 2007

Ohio 2004 Election Records Illegally Destroyed - http://www.alternet.org/story/58328/?page=1

What do you think of this article?

posted by ilovetoledo to politics at 12:41 P.M. EST     (10 Comments)


Comments ...


Big surprise. The way the 2004 election was administered in Ohio was shameful. From Ken Blackwell's drive to disenfranchise as many Democratic voters as possible to the incompetence of local officials in counting and processing ballots, 2004 was a disgrace. Did anyone see this special on PBS last week about Republican efforts to suppress minority turnout in 2004? From the NOW website:

Was there a White House plot to illegally suppress votes in 2004? Is there a similar plan for the upcoming elections? This week NOW examines documents and evidence that points to a Republican Party plan designed to keep Democrats from voting, allegedly by targeting people based on their race and ethnicity with key battleground states like Ohio and Florida of particular interest. "It was a partisan, discriminatory attempt to challenge voters of color," Eddie Hailes, a senior attorney for The Advancement Project, a civil rights group, told NOW.

Was the White House involved? David Iglesias, one of the fired U.S. Attorneys, thinks so: "It's reprehensible. It's unethical, it's unlawful. It may very well be criminal." Iglesias told NOW he was repeatedly urged by his superiors at the Justice Department to investigate allegations of false voter registrations. After his investigations came up short, Iglesias said Republican officials got angry and complained to White House aide Karl Rove. Soon after Iglesias lost his job. As a result of allegations by Iglesias and others, Congress is investigating whether the White House acted unlawfully.


Disgraceful.

posted by Ace_Face at 12:57 P.M. EST on Tue Jul 31, 2007     #



Iglesias told NOW he was repeatedly urged by his superiors at the Justice Department to investigate allegations of false voter registrations. After his investigations came up short,

Sounds to me that there was an investigation. The attourney botched the investigation and got fired. Doesn't sound disgraceful to me.

posted by MikeyA at 03:22 P.M. EST on Tue Jul 31, 2007     #



The attorney didn't botch the investigation. He realized there wasn't enough evidence for a case, so he didn't pursue it.
posted by Chris99 at 03:42 P.M. EST on Tue Jul 31, 2007     #



Iglesias told NOW he was repeatedly urged by his superiors at the Justice Department to investigate allegations of false voter registrations. After his investigations came up short,

Sounds to me that there was an investigation. The attourney botched the investigation and got fired. Doesn't sound disgraceful to me.


Yeah, a politically motivated "investigation" to find that Dems were rigging the election with false registrations, NOT that the Repugnants were rigging the voting machines. He couldn't find any grounds to pull the results Bush and Rove wanted out of his ass, so they fired him.

posted by anonymouscoward at 03:49 P.M. EST on Tue Jul 31, 2007     #



In 2005, Iglesias was recognized by the Justice Department as an expert in the prosecution of election fraud and was chosen twice to train other federal prosecutors on how to combat voter fraud. So I highly doubt that he botched the investigation.

By "come up short" he meant that his investigations of voter fraud that the NM Republicans wanted in time for the 2006 elections. That's why he got canned. The White House and Karl Rove will do whatever they can to keep Republicans in power, even if it means interfering with the traditionally independent AG's offices.

Is it 2008 yet?

posted by Ace_Face at 03:54 P.M. EST on Tue Jul 31, 2007     #



So you two are saying that an investigation into false registrations isn't warranted?

Chris said "He realized there wasn't enough evidence for a case, so he didn't pursue it."

Not enough evidence for a case doesn't mean it isn't happening.

posted by MikeyA at 07:26 P.M. EST on Tue Jul 31, 2007     #



So you two are saying that an investigation into false registrations isn't warranted?

Chris said "He realized there wasn't enough evidence for a case, so he didn't pursue it."

Not enough evidence for a case doesn't mean it isn't happening.


Iglesias did pursue it. From the washingtonpost.com article I linked above:

Iglesias said the fraud allegations are baseless. He formed a bipartisan task force to examine possible vote fraud in September 2004 -- two months before that fall's elections -- after hearing reports of "lots of low-level fraud going on. . . . I figured where there was smoke, there was fire. I wanted to sound a message: We need to have integrity in our election process."

A toll-free telephone number set up by the task force and operated by the FBI generated about 100 calls, three or four of which involved possible violations, Iglesias said. He said he considered prosecuting one case involving a woman signing up voters who put false information on registrations. But, Iglesias said, the case had "evidence problems" that made it difficult to prove the woman was trying to skew the election's outcome.

He said he conferred with the chief of the election-crimes branch of the Justice Department's public integrity section, who was "very lukewarm. So we kind of, in collaboration . . . decided to shut it down."


Here's the deal: Republicans (at least the ones in the White House) don't care about ensuring fair elections. They care about establishing a permanent majority, no matter what it takes. Iglesias looked into it (as he should have) and found nothing. At some point, you have to accept that if an expert Republican appointee looked into the matter and did not prosecute, then the alleged fraud either did not exist or was too trivial to pursue.

And what Iglesias and the other AG's get for maintaining their integrity and refusing to be swayed by political pressures? Tossed out on their asses and replaced by GOP political hacks.

Is it 2008 yet?

posted by Ace_Face at 09:17 P.M. EST on Tue Jul 31, 2007     #



Chris said "He realized there wasn't enough evidence for a case, so he didn't pursue it."

I should have clarified by saying he didn't pursue prosecution.

posted by Chris99 at 10:02 P.M. EST on Tue Jul 31, 2007     #



AGs are charged with enforcing hundreds of federal laws. Would you rather have them pursue weak cases of alleged fraud being pushed by politicians or pursuing real criminal cases?
posted by Ace_Face at 10:23 P.M. EST on Tue Jul 31, 2007     #



This goes back to that voter fraud myth. Organizations like ACORN try to register inner city voters. And because these voters tend to vote Democrat, the Repubs had to counter these efforts by claiming voter fraud to try to stop voter registration efforts.

Don and I recently interview Brian Mellor from Project Vote, and talked a little about this subject. Here is the download if anyone is interested. The interview starts at the 56 minute mark.

posted by Chris99 at 09:35 A.M. EST on Wed Aug 01, 2007     #



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