Toledo Talk

The Andersons retail stores

There is an all employee meeting tomorrow night after store closing. Both stores, mandatory, and security has been brought in. Big announcement. Doesn't sound optimistic from the employees. Ugh.

created by ahmahler on Jan 14, 2017 at 08:35:04 pm     Comments: 175

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Are you saying Goodwill needs to brace for the onslaught of Oxfords and Khakis? :(

posted by justread on Jan 14, 2017 at 08:53:01 pm     #  

All stores or just one?

posted by shamrock44 on Jan 14, 2017 at 08:53:20 pm     #  

Both Toledo stores. Haven't heard about Columbus. They have 1 very busy store and 1 very slow store.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 14, 2017 at 09:02:21 pm     #  

I thought I read somewhere that the new Andersons CEO doesn't like the retail operations because of the low margins, or he doesn't have any experience in it....might be mistaken...correct me if I am wrong on the that one.

If the Andersons indeed closes its retail operations, specifically the one on Talmadge Rd, do you think there could be a possibility that Kroger moves into this spot, instead of the one they are currently looking at? Closing the Krogers on Alexis/Harroun & Secor/Monroe and merging them into the Andersons store on Talmadge into a new Kroger Marketplace? Just throwing this wild idea out there......

posted by WestToledoan on Jan 14, 2017 at 10:37:59 pm     #  

Alexis/Harroun & Secor/Monroe and merging them into the Andersons store on Talmadge

I was confused for a minute; your Alexis/Harroun is actually Monroe/Harroun. I can see them making a move to Talmadge, but they wouldn't close the main Sylvania store - they've upgraded it (though not to a Marketplace) in the last 10 years, and it is MAJOR busy. Most of the traffic is from Sylvania; no way would that traffic move to Talmadge if it closed. The traffic would move to Sautter's or the other Kroger on King/Sylvania.

Is the Talmadge store big enough for a Kroger Marketplace?

Is this maybe the reason the Kroger hearing was again delayed until next month? Kroger caught wind of something?

Truly unfortunate if they do close, though I only shop there for my fruits and veggies. Hmmm, need to spend some gift cards that I have.

posted by MsArcher on Jan 14, 2017 at 11:22:42 pm     #  

When I read this, my heart broke as though I was reading about the loss of a close friend. It's more than just a store to some of us, it's nostalgia.

posted by dell_diva on Jan 15, 2017 at 12:17:29 am     #   2 people liked this

If the Andersons closes, they should build a Par 3 golf course on the site at Monroe and Talmadge. Maybe with a driving range. THAT would be nostalgic.

posted by JohnnyMac on Jan 15, 2017 at 02:31:19 am     #  

MsArcher posted at 10:22:42 PM on Jan 14, 2017:

Alexis/Harroun & Secor/Monroe and merging them into the Andersons store on Talmadge

I was confused for a minute; your Alexis/Harroun is actually Monroe/Harroun. I can see them making a move to Talmadge, but they wouldn't close the main Sylvania store - they've upgraded it (though not to a Marketplace) in the last 10 years, and it is MAJOR busy. Most of the traffic is from Sylvania; no way would that traffic move to Talmadge if it closed. The traffic would move to Sautter's or the other Kroger on King/Sylvania.

Is the Talmadge store big enough for a Kroger Marketplace?

Is this maybe the reason the Kroger hearing was again delayed until next month? Kroger caught wind of something?

Truly unfortunate if they do close, though I only shop there for my fruits and veggies. Hmmm, need to spend some gift cards that I have.

Agree. The Monroe/Harroun Kroger is busy all the time, and it primarily seems to be customers from Sylvania & Ottawa Lake. (Just based on who I see when I'm in there 2-3 times a week.) :)

I wouldn't make the drive to Talmadge/Monroe just to shop at Kroger. I'd go to one of the other stores closer to home first (Sautters, Meijer, the Kroger at Sylvania/King, etc.)

posted by mom2 on Jan 15, 2017 at 07:11:00 am     #  

dell_diva posted at 11:17:29 PM on Jan 14, 2017:

When I read this, my heart broke as though I was reading about the loss of a close friend. It's more than just a store to some of us, it's nostalgia.

I think they call this anticipatory grief.

posted by justread on Jan 15, 2017 at 07:14:54 am     #  

WestToledoan posted at 09:37:59 PM on Jan 14, 2017:

I thought I read somewhere that the new Andersons CEO doesn't like the retail operations because of the low margins, or he doesn't have any experience in it....might be mistaken...correct me if I am wrong on the that one.

If the Andersons indeed closes its retail operations, specifically the one on Talmadge Rd, do you think there could be a possibility that Kroger moves into this spot, instead of the one they are currently looking at? Closing the Krogers on Alexis/Harroun & Secor/Monroe and merging them into the Andersons store on Talmadge into a new Kroger Marketplace? Just throwing this wild idea out there......

The new CEO does not like the stores because they have lost money for years. This was inevitable. They can't compete with the combination of online retailers, and the Kroger/Meijer's of the world.

posted by glasscityguy on Jan 15, 2017 at 11:14:11 am     #   1 person liked this

glasscityguy posted at 10:14:11 AM on Jan 15, 2017:
WestToledoan posted at 09:37:59 PM on Jan 14, 2017:

I thought I read somewhere that the new Andersons CEO doesn't like the retail operations because of the low margins, or he doesn't have any experience in it....might be mistaken...correct me if I am wrong on the that one.

If the Andersons indeed closes its retail operations, specifically the one on Talmadge Rd, do you think there could be a possibility that Kroger moves into this spot, instead of the one they are currently looking at? Closing the Krogers on Alexis/Harroun & Secor/Monroe and merging them into the Andersons store on Talmadge into a new Kroger Marketplace? Just throwing this wild idea out there......

The new CEO does not like the stores because they have lost money for years. This was inevitable. They can't compete with the combination of online retailers, and the Kroger/Meijer's of the world.

I disagree that they can't compete. They very much could, but they've never been willing or interested in leading with any one piece. As far as grocers go-they're sub mediocre, with strengths in produce and wine/ beer. They've tried to adapt over the years, but in both Columbus and Toledo, they seem like a relic. They could be primed for a reinvention, but I doubt they will. Best case scenario is they have an independent buyer for all stores. There are a few groups that have the capital and expertise to execute. Dorothy Lane Markets (Dayton), Heinens ( NE Ohio) and Jungle Jims (Cincinnati), all have the wherewithal to right the grocery side of the equation and could easily expand to markets their other ventures haven't touched yet.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 15, 2017 at 11:50:50 am     #   2 people liked this

Tick, Tock, Tick Tock.............this could very well be the beginning of the end

posted by Hoops on Jan 15, 2017 at 12:51:41 pm     #  

It would take a significant investment from the Andersons leadership to turn around the general stores. They have been perennial money losers for years. They simply do not have the buying power of bigger players like Kroger, Meijer, etc. For the first half of 2016, the retail stores posted a loss of more than $1 million dollars. Time to cut your losses and get out of the segment.

posted by WestToledoan on Jan 15, 2017 at 03:31:58 pm     #   1 person liked this

2008 was the last year the Retail Group turned a profit: $843k net on sales of $173 million. Between 2009 - 2015 they lost $19.45 million on the Retail Group, final 2016 #s aren't public yet but they lost $4.6m in the first 3 qtrs. Non-local shareholders (the vast majority) and analysts never understood the retail side, it was viewed as a family legacy hobby business - more a distraction than core competency.

With new competitive entrants in the local market it might be as good a time as any to turn out the lights, perhaps Dan is finally ready to retire. Sucks for the many employees and loyal shoppers, but it's long been a when not if question.

posted by bam2 on Jan 15, 2017 at 03:32:25 pm     #   1 person liked this

A relative that works at the Talmadge store confirms the meeting tonight.

posted by MsUnderstood on Jan 15, 2017 at 03:48:38 pm     #  

Any chance they could be selling the retail business? It seems odd they just closed the Sylvania Ave store 3 months ago and now they are closing the rest. This is really sad. I went to the Sylvania Ave store at least once week (because I didn't want it to close), when it closed I consoled myself that Talmadge and Monroe isn't that far away.

posted by trixanne on Jan 15, 2017 at 07:03:23 pm     #  

JohnnyMac posted at 01:31:19 AM on Jan 15, 2017:

If the Andersons closes, they should build a Par 3 golf course on the site at Monroe and Talmadge. Maybe with a driving range. THAT would be nostalgic.

Great idea! It all comes full circle. Next bring back Putt-Putt if Kohl's on Monroe closes.

posted by breaker on Jan 15, 2017 at 07:07:14 pm     #  

As some one in the grocery business for 42 years, I've always admired and shook my head at the way The Anderson's did business. Innovative, for Toledo, unique, destination appeal. A disorganized cluster f*#k otherwise. I never went there expecting a bargain, but I knew I'd see, find offerings competitors would not have. They're buyers and systems were inflexible to suppliers, who found them difficult to do business with. Likely to late, but they needed a CEO with experience. The general mdse. side of the store was in constant change. The part that competed with the likes of Home Depot was a decent operation in my opinion. The rest was way over priced and didn't have mass appeal. I don't see The Anderson's as a retailer that is under direct assault by the Amazons of the world and can survive were Sears, Macy's, Kohl's, etc. can't. They need leadership and money. The end need not be inevitable. The thought of a Jungle Jim's on Talmadge Rd should make Kroger, Meijer, Sautters very concerned.

posted by bphtol1 on Jan 15, 2017 at 08:21:04 pm     #   2 people liked this

The Andersons to close Toledo, Maumee, Columbus retail stores
http://www.13abc.com/content/breaking/The-Andersons-to-close-all-four-retail-stores-in-Ohio--410785095.html

Worst case scenario...

posted by ahmahler on Jan 15, 2017 at 08:42:44 pm     #  

Closing in May. Dan Anderson is very very upset, crying during announcement. But the run in retail is over.

posted by Xbuckeyex on Jan 15, 2017 at 08:43:08 pm     #  

Their new CEO Pat Bowe has not good for this region.

posted by toledoramblingman on Jan 15, 2017 at 08:44:39 pm     #  

This explains why tony packos bought del taco as well.

posted by Xbuckeyex on Jan 15, 2017 at 08:46:21 pm     #   1 person liked this

Huh, you're right! Wonder if Krogers would be interested in the Talmadge location? Seems perfect.

posted by upso on Jan 15, 2017 at 09:01:19 pm     #  

Second time in two years newish CEO Bowe has taken advantage of the MLK business holiday as foil for bad news. On this date last year, he tore down the storied Perrysburg riverfront estate in order to put up his McMansion on the same spot. (It's still not done.) Maybe next year on this date he'll demolish the Cherry St. cough, cough Bridge.

posted by SavageFred on Jan 15, 2017 at 09:25:09 pm     #  

Sad.
The Tiedke's closing of our generation.

posted by justread on Jan 15, 2017 at 09:38:14 pm     #  

toledoramblingman posted at 07:44:39 PM on Jan 15, 2017:

Their new CEO Pat Bowe has not good for this region.

It is not just Pat's call. Mike Anderson is still the president of the board. I am sure he supported this.

posted by glasscityguy on Jan 15, 2017 at 09:40:13 pm     #  

$20 million in losses over 8 years. That's insane.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 15, 2017 at 09:51:57 pm     #   1 person liked this

Back in the day they could compete with Carter Lumber and 84 . Just as neighborhood hardware stores , The Andersons couldn't compete with the likes of Menards ,Home Depot , Lowes and Walmart. It wasn't cheaper to shop there , but for me , it was local. Now ask yourself , who would want to buy the Maumee store? It's not on any kind of a main highway at all and nothing nearby. I wouldn't be surprised if The Andersons dozed it and put it to use for the operation across the street. Then there's the city of Maumee and Lucas County .Lost income tax $$ , property taxes and sales taxes. It truly is the Tiedkes of our day , a great loss.

posted by marving on Jan 15, 2017 at 11:10:38 pm     #  

Sales taxes probably won't be affected because the people spending money there will just spend it at other stores in Lucas County. Property taxes will still have to be paid on both properties and might even increase if newer and bigger buildings are built on either or both sites...

posted by Mike21 on Jan 15, 2017 at 11:20:23 pm     #  

Where will the cheese wheel go?

posted by MrGlass419 on Jan 15, 2017 at 11:23:19 pm     #   2 people liked this

I live near the Talmadge store AND WOULD HATE if the Secor Kroger would move to the Andersons location. That Kroger attracts the gang bangers, druggies, and pimps/johns (saw a pimp/John/prostitute exchange happen in the parking lot one Saturday evening. Honestly, if that happens--put a wreath on the Monroe/Talmadge area being safe.

How about an IKEA?

posted by Clancy on Jan 15, 2017 at 11:41:53 pm     #  

Clancy posted at 10:41:53 PM on Jan 15, 2017:

I live near the Talmadge store AND WOULD HATE if the Secor Kroger would move to the Andersons location. That Kroger attracts the gang bangers, druggies, and pimps/johns (saw a pimp/John/prostitute exchange happen in the parking lot one Saturday evening. Honestly, if that happens--put a wreath on the Monroe/Talmadge area being safe.

How about an IKEA?

I don't think the problem activities would necessarily follow Kroger more than a mile down the road. I know it's only a mile away, but those two areas are pretty different.

I looked at AREIS - that Anderson's store is over 160,000 square feet and sits on over 16 acres. Would definitely fit a Kroger Marketplace - though I'm sure they would tear it down and build new. It's valued at $7 million - $2 million more than what Kroger was offering to buy the SND property for. And it would be moving the store's target market a bit. Will be interesting to see if Kroger shifts their plans. (And would be unfortunate for the Sisters, as there is no viable Plan B for that property that will net them the $5 million they need).

posted by MsArcher on Jan 16, 2017 at 12:12:07 am     #   1 person liked this

Second time in two years newish CEO Bowe has taken advantage of the MLK business holiday as foil for bad news.

Interesting yet comical suggestion. Begs comical responses, but I'm too sad.

posted by justread on Jan 16, 2017 at 07:38:51 am     #  

Second time in two years newish CEO Bowe has taken advantage of the MLK business holiday as foil for bad news.

Interesting yet comical suggestion. Begs comical responses, but I'm too sad.

posted by justread on Jan 16, 2017 at 07:38:52 am     #  

Truly a sad event, my primary shopping spot. Can't think of anything that could replace them, certainly by visiting a multitude of shops but nothing comes close in some categories. Their wine, deli, beer and specialty groceries were second to none...a sad day indeed.

posted by breeman on Jan 16, 2017 at 08:24:48 am     #  

Always enjoyed Dan's commercials with a huge smile inviting to come in for the "wines and cheeses." Their grandfather, Harold, insisted that it was necessary to get out of yourself and help the other guy as the only path towards happiness. The boys are all good fellas and took his words to heart. The company enjoyed some flush years after the ipo and the boom of bio-fuels. Venerable company but Wall St. doesn't work on feelings.

posted by Mariner on Jan 16, 2017 at 09:09:57 am     #  

This is a gut-punch for the area.

I have shopped at the Andersons ever since moving to Toledo in 1990. I live only a half-mile from the Talmadge store, and it has long been my go-to destination for lots of items: plants and garden supplies, dog food, home improvement items, specialty foods... on and on.

I will miss the employees, too. Many of them have worked there for decades, and I can always count on seeing some of the same faces every time I shop there.

But not for long.

I think I will shop there today just to pay my respects. Not sure what I will buy, but I will find something I need.

And I will probably feel more depressed after doing so.

posted by historymike on Jan 16, 2017 at 09:31:19 am     #   1 person liked this

I remember going to the original store on the north side of the street before Christmas when I was about 5 or 6. Super toy department. Good stuff to, such as metal tractors. manure spreaders, etc.

They won't make much the 1st quarter as gift cards are hurriedly redeemed.

posted by Trilby on Jan 16, 2017 at 10:09:51 am     #  

Apparantly they haven't made anything in the first - or any quarter - for years... thus the closing.

posted by Mike21 on Jan 16, 2017 at 10:39:09 am     #   2 people liked this

Needless to say, the fallout from these closures hits a multitude of people. The employees, obviously, count over 1,000. There are some experts in these stores, that will have a very difficult time finding similar work elsewhere. In my little universe, the beverage suppliers are scrambling, and it's expected that several vendors will stop or reduce servicing the Toledo area, as a result. Anderson's occupied the #2-4 spots of the largest wine/ beer retailers in the state. That business will be handed over, very unceremoniously to large, clumsy disinterested chains.

This is a plea-If you bought beer/ wine at Anderson's, do not spend that money at Kroger/ Meijer/ Fresh Market, etc. Instead-go to Joseph's, Sautter's, Marino's, Pauken, Walt Churchill's, Kazmaier's, Holloway. Keep that money in the hands of people that will help to curate a carefully thought out selection. Otherwise, we will get the homogenized market that the large corporations want to give us.

Finally-Follow the people and the talent as they continue their careers away from The Anderson's. As I said, there are experts in the field. They will no doubt surface elsewhere. Support them and their goal to give consumers a better experience.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 16, 2017 at 10:39:31 am     #   8 people liked this

Trilby, store had wood floors and more farm implements than anything else. Don't believe anything was made in Taiwan

posted by Mariner on Jan 16, 2017 at 10:43:35 am     #  

My family started going to the Anderson's store on Illinois in 1953 when it was across the street from its present location. It truly catered to farmers then, cattle prods and all. My dad was building our house at the time (while we lived in it) and there were no Lowes or Home Depot

My dad spent so much time at the Anderson's that while was shopping, he was often mistaken for a sales clerk. He always answered questions and took people to whatever part or item they were looking for. After he retired from Jeep, we suggested he should get a part time job there. He refused, saying he had worked since he was 16 and had put in 43 years at Jeep, and he was done working. Then he promptly went out to his garage and started
repairing neighbors lawnmowers and snowblowers. Members of the Greatest Generation couldn't sit idle for long.

The Anderson's will be greatly missed for the wonderful produce (best in town); baked goods, especially the bread; cheese department; and the lawn and garden. Where will I get my spring and summer flowers? At least at my age, I won't have to do without them for too many years.

Title:

posted by CatLady on Jan 16, 2017 at 10:49:31 am     #   1 person liked this

ahmahler posted at 09:39:31 AM on Jan 16, 2017:

Needless to say, the fallout from these closures hits a multitude of people. The employees, obviously, count over 1,000. There are some experts in these stores, that will have a very difficult time finding similar work elsewhere. In my little universe, the beverage suppliers are scrambling, and it's expected that several vendors will stop or reduce servicing the Toledo area, as a result. Anderson's occupied the #2-4 spots of the largest wine/ beer retailers in the state. That business will be handed over, very unceremoniously to large, clumsy disinterested chains.

This is a plea-If you bought beer/ wine at Anderson's, do not spend that money at Kroger/ Meijer/ Fresh Market, etc. Instead-go to Joseph's, Sautter's, Marino's, Pauken, Walt Churchill's, Kazmaier's, Holloway. Keep that money in the hands of people that will help to curate a carefully thought out selection. Otherwise, we will get the homogenized market that the large corporations want to give us.

Finally-Follow the people and the talent as they continue their careers away from The Anderson's. As I said, there are experts in the field. They will no doubt surface elsewhere. Support them and their goal to give consumers a better experience.

Fair enough. Been a Pauken customer for a long time.

posted by justread on Jan 16, 2017 at 10:56:17 am     #   2 people liked this

They won't make much the 1st quarter as gift cards are hurriedly redeemed.

That's not the way gift cards work on the financial statements. When you buy a gift card, it is a liability for the company, because they owe you product (they just received the cash in advance). When the gift card is redeemed/used, that is when the 'sale' is made and recorded on the income statement. Use of the gift cards actually improve the financials, although cash flow is unaffected.

I only went to the Anderson's when the fruit selection at Walmart/Kroger sucked. Anderson's always had great fruit - but at a price. Thus, the reason they are closing.

posted by MsArcher on Jan 16, 2017 at 10:59:39 am     #   2 people liked this

I might try lobbying Walt Churchill's to take up the European specialty holiday confections which Andersons used to provide. The holiday cookies from Germany, Switzerland, and Austria were the main reason I did my Christmas shopping there (as well as the Dietsch chocolates made in Findlay). A mere fraction of that is available at Aldi and Fresh Market.

Walt could also take up the Wheel o' Cheese challenge -- the P'burg store is large enough to accommodate the crowd.

posted by viola on Jan 16, 2017 at 11:03:23 am     #  

Regarding the Maumee retail store, it was announced at the January 15 meeting that the lawnmower shop and the garden department will be retained. The two retail stores in Columbus shall close.

posted by flinty on Jan 16, 2017 at 11:30:44 am     #  

I'm betting that you will see Walt's Markets step up to fill the void in a big way. I can't think of anyone else in town who is better suited and more capable. I do love Sautter's but I don't believe that Jim has the where-with-all that Walt Churchill does.

posted by Foodie on Jan 16, 2017 at 11:32:55 am     #  

Foodie-I totally agree about Walt. They've already built an outstanding clientele at both locations, and stand to really benefit. I'm quite concerned about the market in Sylvania/ West Toledo.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 16, 2017 at 11:35:47 am     #  

SavageFred posted at 08:25:09 PM on Jan 15, 2017:

Second time in two years newish CEO Bowe has taken advantage of the MLK business holiday as foil for bad news. On this date last year, he tore down the storied Perrysburg riverfront estate in order to put up his McMansion on the same spot. (It's still not done.) Maybe next year on this date he'll demolish the Cherry St. cough, cough Bridge.

Note to self: stay away from the keyboard when under the influence of night-time cold medicine. Although the MLK day 2'fer bit is true, not sure what I meant by the bridge part.

Totally bummed, I've been shopping there my entire life, even when the Maumee store was located across the street from it's present location. That said, aside from the food/deli/beer/pet food and to a lesser extent tools and workwear, the products offered by the remaining departments had become downright schizophrenic in the last decade. It was almost like they were trying to fail.

Given the sheer amount of volume the stores do in beer/wine, I wonder if the "food/booze" portion of the retailer (everything to the right as you enter the Maumee store) could have survived in a smaller location with lower overhead and payroll.

In its 70's heyday, you could get a saddle, Levis, brake pads and a muffler, fishing tackle, a box of 12 gauge shells and BBs for the younger fellas, Deep Purple's "Live in Japan" LP and a set of headphones to listen to it on, a CB radio, Aurora A/FX slot cars and track, and some tasty sammich fixins all in one place. Oh, and don't forget the giant bin of shelled peanuts in the entrance. Oh crap, I just realized what significant impact that place had on my life.

posted by SavageFred on Jan 16, 2017 at 12:25:19 pm     #   3 people liked this

Anybody notice that for the biggest local news story in some time, that the Blade is saving mony by not printing today?

posted by Trilby on Jan 16, 2017 at 12:39:13 pm     #  

Someone said they're going to retain the lawn and garden in Maumee. Is that for sure? I didn't see that in any of the news stories. All I saw is that they're going to sell the lawn mower repair business.

posted by CatLady on Jan 16, 2017 at 12:45:16 pm     #  

News article I saw said they were "actively seeking a buyer" for it. Ironically, a tweet from the Blade is how I learned of this last evening.

posted by Foodie on Jan 16, 2017 at 12:49:29 pm     #  

This is nothing less than tragic. The stores are a local institution. Irreplaceable. I grew up a mile away from the Maumee store and went there more times than I remember as a kid. Andersons was the source for 90% of my dad's projects and man he had a lot of projects. If he ever lost or needed a tool, I knew where we were headed. To this day, their hardware section is the only one that always has the nuts and bolts I need for my tv mounts.

I forgot about the music section they used to have... picked up many a $3.99 nice price cassette there in the 80s. They had video games for a while, too.

Is going public ultimately the reason why they had to close? The company makes more than enough to support the retail arm. For a company that wealthy, it seems like keeping the stores is a way of giving back to the community. Is it the shareholders that wouldn't allow it?

posted by mixman on Jan 16, 2017 at 01:16:57 pm     #   1 person liked this

Very sad news.

I hope the Tireman division remains open. Fortunately we rarely require their services, but it is nice having a tire store and a place for oil changes so close to downtown. Munro is downtown as well but their service has declined and the prices have increased since they took over.

posted by classylady on Jan 16, 2017 at 01:49:20 pm     #  

At least we have Fresh Thyme across the street but nothing like the Anderson's and the parking sucks at Thyme

posted by classylady on Jan 16, 2017 at 01:49:55 pm     #  

classylady posted at 12:49:20 PM on Jan 16, 2017:

Very sad news.

I hope the Tireman division remains open. Fortunately we rarely require their services, but it is nice having a tire store and a place for oil changes so close to downtown. Munro is downtown as well but their service has declined and the prices have increased since they took over.

The Andersons sold the Tireman division quite some time ago.

posted by Foodie on Jan 16, 2017 at 01:50:59 pm     #  

I thought Tireman was part of Anderson's. My bad

posted by classylady on Jan 16, 2017 at 02:00:00 pm     #  

My prediction is that grocery and hardware will come full circle and we will start to see smaller, neighborhood type places get opened...but not with local ownership.....they will be fully owned by Home Depot, Lowes, Walmart, Meijer types. Customers never wanted to leave those places (located 5-10 mins away from their homes)...but the prices and selections at the big box stores were too enticing. The internet has changed all of it. Mega stores arent needed. What will be needed is service and a delivery point. Thats where the local locations will come into play.

posted by BulldogBuckeye on Jan 16, 2017 at 02:05:22 pm     #   1 person liked this

Is going public ultimately the reason why they had to close? The company makes more than enough to support the retail arm. For a company that wealthy, it seems like keeping the stores is a way of giving back to the community. Is it the shareholders that wouldn't allow it?

Weak link created enough liability to make an otherwise strong organization possible prey for hostile takeover. They have never lacked in ways to give back to the community, and this won't end that. This prevents exactly the same thing from happening on someone else's terms. I am sure 2016 was a harsh wake up call when HC2 made their play.

posted by justread on Jan 16, 2017 at 02:40:12 pm     #   2 people liked this

That's true. It would've been worse to have a takeover then lose the stores anyway. At least the rest of the company, or headquarters, can stay local.

posted by mixman on Jan 16, 2017 at 04:43:33 pm     #  

I will really miss the store and this really bums me out, but I keep thinking they may just save the patient by removing the bad part. In the long run, a very healthy four division Andersons is better than an imperiled 5 division Andersons. But it still sucks and I feel for the people who are losing jobs because I think they have good people.

posted by justread on Jan 16, 2017 at 04:56:37 pm     #  

I believe The Andersons is a major advertiser for The Blade. One card falling could start others....

posted by Molsonator on Jan 16, 2017 at 04:58:38 pm     #  

The Blade is to The Andersons Retail Division as
BCI is to The Andersons.

Although my money is on The Blade in an 8 year loss contest.

posted by justread on Jan 16, 2017 at 05:03:23 pm     #  

The Maumee store is ingrained in my childhood and most of my adulthood (although I have been unfaithful and shopped at Lowes/Home Depot because they are now closer to me...and when I need a part real quick I dive in there).

This is a flagship business of Northwest Ohio. Maybe not internationally known like Jeep, but flagship nonetheless. Truly a loss.

posted by oldhometown on Jan 16, 2017 at 05:40:07 pm     #  

ahmahler, I just went to Sautter's and spent a few bucks on baking supplies and German specialty bread ... exactly what I would always check for at Andersons first.

Interesting to see that Sautter's has now crammed a whole bunch of wine into a narrow area near produce. If they could afford to close for remodeling at some point, they could be the local Jungle Jim's or Dorothy Lane.

There seems to be some tension in the basic mission of grocery stores at this point: sometimes it needs to be an immersive, creative experience and sometimes it just needs to be convenient with low prices and cheap cookies/candy/ice cream. Tough balancing act.

posted by viola on Jan 16, 2017 at 06:40:05 pm     #  

And by the way -- major kudos to Andersons administration for waiting until after Christmas for this decision/announcement. It made a difference in everyone's quality of life.

posted by viola on Jan 16, 2017 at 06:56:11 pm     #   1 person liked this

I dunno, I wasn't really surprised to see this happen with Andersons. I am disappointed, but not surprised.

Years ago, if you wanted the "good" wine, you went to a wine store. If you wanted the "good" cheese, you went to a real deli. If you wanted the"good"produce, you went to a produce market. If you needed some new knobs for your cabinets, you went to a hardware store. Good bread ? The bakery. Couple of fancy plants for your porch, the greenhouse.

BUT. If you were throwing a party, and you wanted ALL of that in one shot, you went to Andersons !!!! And I'm sure I speak for all of us, when I say that if you went in there for two or three items, you came out of there with a LOT more than that. And you felt GOOD. Because you picked up a lot of extra things that you wouldn't normally buy, and you felt like you treated yourself.

But then along came the big box home improvement stores. Then the grocery stores started expanding their deli meats and cheeses with the imported stuff. They expanded their wine selection. And so on.

The difference ? The employees at Andersons KNEW what they were selling. They trained their employees well. Every employee I ever encountered at Andersons seemed happy to be there. But, somewhere along the line , that stopped being a good enough reason for me to frequent their store as much as I used to.

A few (?) years ago, when they changed things up at the Talmadge Rd store, they just started carrying TOO many different types of items, and not enough of a selection of any of them . It just became too chaotic in there for me. I don't know, that happy ,fuzzy feeling I used to get when shopping at Andersons went away when they changed it all up like that.

posted by foodie88 on Jan 16, 2017 at 07:25:19 pm     #   1 person liked this

An institution is truly lost. My first memory is the Anderson's on the south side of Illinois. The old store in the 70s. In the 80's, I could count on them for cheap car stereo gear.

posted by jbtaurus98 on Jan 16, 2017 at 10:27:39 pm     #  

We used to go to Red Wells in the outer building on the Illinois property and then after a great roast beef sandwich, would get our shopping done at the Anderson's for whatever needs we had.

Those were the days :-)

posted by shamrock44 on Jan 16, 2017 at 11:05:22 pm     #  

44 only know this by second party but Red Wells was reported to be a fav cure the hangover spot for those who had abused their still moving corpses. Am guessing they told me the truth.

posted by Mariner on Jan 17, 2017 at 10:18:42 am     #  

When we first moved here in 1983, fresh out of college and totally broke, we depended on the Anderson's because they were foolish enough to issue us a credit card. Until we learned how to survive the harsh times between paychecks, the Anderson's card was our lifeline. We even had the option of making cash withdrawls on it at any National City Bank. Truly a Godsend.
Later, when we were more disciplined with our spending, the rule at my house was that I was not allowed to go to the Anderson's alone. If I did, it was inevitably a 100 dollar-plus receipt I came home with.
I cannot express how saddened I am by this announcement. The homogenization of Toledo continues at a brisk pace.

posted by Toledostrong on Jan 17, 2017 at 05:36:15 pm     #  

It's the homogenization of retail, period. We had a longer run of good times than other places, believe it or not. The existence of Andersons/Westgate/Thackerays is one of the reasons I chose to move here after investigating other cities. It was like regaining 15 years of quality living.

posted by viola on Jan 17, 2017 at 07:07:41 pm     #  

Someone I failed to mention previously-Holloway Beverage has one of the best craft beer selections in the area, and they are expanding. They also fill growlers and special orders. Good guys. While you're there-get a gyro at Gyro Kabob Express and a Boardwalk Pizza from Mama Mary's.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 17, 2017 at 10:46:16 pm     #  

As a 'beer guy' Holloway is my least favorite place to shop for beer, by far.

posted by SensorG on Jan 17, 2017 at 11:46:50 pm     #  

Second props on a gyro from Kabob Express...been going there since Sammy opened up...

posted by Mike21 on Jan 18, 2017 at 12:37:05 am     #  

SensorG posted at 10:46:50 PM on Jan 17, 2017:

As a 'beer guy' Holloway is my least favorite place to shop for beer, by far.

do tell

posted by ahmahler on Jan 18, 2017 at 08:08:19 am     #   1 person liked this

ahmahler posted at 07:08:19 AM on Jan 18, 2017:
SensorG posted at 10:46:50 PM on Jan 17, 2017:

As a 'beer guy' Holloway is my least favorite place to shop for beer, by far.

do tell

I question some of their business practices, without going into detail, maybe my knowledge of OH and MI liquor laws is just rusty.

They also have a tendency to price gouge on the rare or harder to get beer. Often they are a dollar or two more per bottle than everyone else in town.

Way too many old and outdated IPAs sitting around.

Lastly, they don't know anything about beer. No doubt they are a couple of hard working guys, but it feels like it's a couple of life long bud lite drinkers trying to re-invent themselves.

Bonus - nice hookah selection...

posted by SensorG on Jan 18, 2017 at 09:09:56 am     #  

What's a hookah?

posted by Mariner on Jan 18, 2017 at 09:35:57 am     #   1 person liked this

What's a hookah?

Is that not another name for a lady of ill repute?

posted by Wydowmaker on Jan 18, 2017 at 01:19:15 pm     #  

Mariner posted at 08:35:57 AM on Jan 18, 2017:

What's a hookah?

I think I have their headers on my Nova.

posted by justread on Jan 18, 2017 at 02:21:44 pm     #  

Nova? Guess one does see stars all the time when using a hookah. Come see the USA in my Chevrolet or take a ride on my magic boat.

posted by Mariner on Jan 18, 2017 at 04:55:16 pm     #  

Anderson's retail closing will send a ripple affect through the area. Local farmers depend heavily on selling to the Andersons..many small vendors and business owners depend heavily on them to sell their products. Local nurseries supply the Andersons as well. Job loss will be alot more than just the 650 announced.

posted by bailey on Jan 18, 2017 at 09:30:25 pm     #  

I'm hoping the addition of Fresh Thyme and Whole Food 365 will mitigate some of the local farmers losses. They both specialize in local producers.

posted by Xbuckeyex on Jan 18, 2017 at 11:24:26 pm     #  

bailey posted at 08:30:25 PM on Jan 18, 2017:

Anderson's retail closing will send a ripple affect through the area. Local farmers depend heavily on selling to the Andersons..many small vendors and business owners depend heavily on them to sell their products. Local nurseries supply the Andersons as well. Job loss will be alot more than just the 650 announced.

There is a yin for every yang, so to speak.
They haven't announced ANY of the jobs that will be created because of this. Because the clever people who spot the opportunity are still scrambling. But everything is even more interdependent than you suggest. That's just level one. Maybe Pauken will grow and take the space next door and add some small grocery items.
There are opportunities to be found in change.
75% of the Andersons jobs were part time. Retail.
We did not just lose silicon valley, although the psychological impact and the shock is real, and certainly we all feel for those who will be inconvenienced.

The market will shake this out. Like amahler, I hope people direct their spending and need for these goods in ways that favor the small northwest ohio businesspeople you allude to. That would be a silver lining. Meijer, Wal-Mart and Kroger will benefit enough no matter what else occurs.

posted by justread on Jan 19, 2017 at 06:55:11 am     #   4 people liked this

To Justread's point, I had 2 separate conversations yesterday that surrounded speculation on what happens next. There will be a massive void in Sylvania/ West Toledo for wine/ beer. That void will create an opportunity (or rather opportunities). It's too early to say what, if anything fills that, but this conversation of "What Replaces Anderson's?" is being held throughout the area. It would be tragic if it were nothing.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 19, 2017 at 07:23:17 am     #  

The homogenization of Toledo continues at a brisk pace.

This is the lingering issue when the shock of the loss of such a long-beloved institution and impact to the staff ease over time.

I'd go out of my way to support anyone who takes a chance because of this realignment.

posted by justread on Jan 19, 2017 at 08:09:13 am     #  

Good points justread. Cream settles to the top while shit goes back to their sofa and widescreen tv and sits on their fat ass.

posted by Mariner on Jan 19, 2017 at 08:51:50 am     #   1 person liked this

Layoffs begin in March, I see. If I were hiring for similar jobs I would be happy to talk with Andersons people. I have always felt that Andersons excelled at hiring good people with good attitudes. Your mileage may vary, but that has been mine.

posted by justread on Jan 19, 2017 at 10:21:18 am     #  

When The Andersons retail stores close, Toledo will become a little less interesting and less useful, in my opinion.

It seemed that The Andersons treated their retail employees with decency, and the store seemed interested in the community.

In the 25-plus years that I have lived in the Toledo area, I'm sure that I have shopped at The Andersons more than anywhere else. I've probably spent more money at The Andersons than all other stores combined.

Before moving to the Toledo area, I lived in Marysville, and I occasionally visited The Andersons store near Dublin for the fishing tackle. The Andersons stopped selling fishing gear early last decade.

When I moved here, I don't think that I knew that The Andersons was headquartered in Maumee, but I was glad to see a familiar store that I could patronize for wide variety of items.


I agree with breeman's comment above:

  • my primary shopping spot.
  • Can't think of anything that could replace them

And historymike's comment

  • This is a gut-punch for the area.
  • I have shopped at the Andersons ever since moving to Toledo in 1990.
  • it has long been my go-to destination for lots of items: plants and garden supplies, dog food, home improvement items, specialty foods... on and on.
  • I will miss the employees, too. Many of them have worked there for decades, and I can always count on seeing some of the same faces every time I shop there.


Excerpt from Mike21's comment

Sales taxes probably won't be affected because the people spending money there will just spend it at other stores in Lucas County.

That will probably be true overall, but it won't apply to me personally.

For some reason, I have little to no interest in the "exciting" non-locally-owned chain stores. Whole Foods, Fresh-whatever, mean nothing to me.

I realize that many people like the chains. For those shoppers, it's their money and their time. My wife likes shopping at Kroger and Costco, but I never have. I always chose The Andersons even if I wound up spending a little more.

I have no use for the chains because I have a small list of locally-owned stores that I patronize, which satisfy my shopping needs.

The Andersons, however, was super damn convenient. One stop. My other locally-owned favorites may pick up some of the slack, and I'll probably shop a bit more at the nearby Dollar Store, but I'm not going to make three or four trips that could have been done in one visit at The Andersons.

I'm guessing that Amazon.com will be a popular replacement shopping option for me for some items.

The argument against using Amazon would that the chains employ local people. Yeah, well, my time and my money. (that could be stage 2 talk)


Toledostrong's comment

  • I cannot express how saddened I am by this announcement.
  • The homogenization of Toledo continues at a brisk pace.


Sometimes we hear the goofy-ass debate about whether a corporation can be a person or if a corporation has soul. I don't even know what in the hell any of that means. Don't care.

Many stores feel like only stores. Nothing more. Means to an end. But for some reason, The Andersons was always a comfortable, reliable, and pleasant shopping experience.

I'm guessing that the people who worked at The Andersons stores, and the people who decided to keep the stores going while losing money made the store meaningful for a few of us.

I'd like to say 'Thanks' to the employees for making The Andersons a long-time, good neighbor.

posted by jr on Jan 19, 2017 at 11:05:17 am     #   8 people liked this

Anderson's retail has joined the list that includes Foodtown, Giant Eagle, Cub Foods, Centre, Sterlings, A&P, the large Churchhills locations (They did successfully downsize and specialize), K-Mart, Best Products, Service Merchandise, Handy Andy, Builder's Square, 84 Lumber, Banner Mattress, Lanes Drugs, Woolworth's, The Lion Store, Lasalles, Blockbuster Video, Circuit City, The Limited - and others that once thrived in the area but eventually couldn't survive. Now we have Kroger Superstores, Meijer, Costco, Sam's Club, Wallmart, Home Depot, Menards, Lowes, Best Buy, ABC Warehouse, a bigger Appliance Center and others in their place. Nostalgia aside, rest assured all the consumer needs in the area will still be met - you just won't be able to do it in one stop.

posted by Mike21 on Jan 19, 2017 at 11:25:45 am     #  

Xbuckeyex, a quick question: does Fresh Thyme really specialize in local produce? I've never seen much seasonal stuff in there that is local -- other than apples.

posted by viola on Jan 19, 2017 at 01:51:38 pm     #  

Also, I have no love for Kroger, but it's headquartered in Cincinnati, while Meijer's is headquartered even closer to home (Grand Rapids, MI). So patronizing chain stores that ultimately benefit the economies of Michigan and Ohio ... how is that evil?

Many, many things sold at Andersons were made in China, just like similar merchandise in Meijer's and Target and WalMart.

Just sayin'.

posted by viola on Jan 19, 2017 at 01:59:54 pm     #  

viola posted at 12:51:38 PM on Jan 19, 2017:

Xbuckeyex, a quick question: does Fresh Thyme really specialize in local produce? I've never seen much seasonal stuff in there that is local -- other than apples.

Well I've only been there a few times, I know that part of their business plan was integrating the local farmers. Don't know enough about them to say if that has happened.

posted by Xbuckeyex on Jan 19, 2017 at 02:05:51 pm     #  

Meijer and Fresh Thyme are the same organization-they both attempt to buy as much in season produce from local (<200 miles from store) as possible. Kroger now advertises Ohio grown produce. Andersons bought much produce in Detroit. I'd be curious to hear about the economics from a grower. The big change is the curation of sets. Someone in Cincinnati may decide what you get to shop for at your local Kroger-while people you interact with, can educate you and select based on your feedback at a local store.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 19, 2017 at 02:18:20 pm     #  

viola posted at 12:59:54 PM on Jan 19, 2017:

Also, I have no love for Kroger, but it's headquartered in Cincinnati, while Meijer's is headquartered even closer to home (Grand Rapids, MI). So patronizing chain stores that ultimately benefit the economies of Michigan and Ohio ... how is that evil?

Many, many things sold at Andersons were made in China, just like similar merchandise in Meijer's and Target and WalMart.

Just sayin'.

Not "evil." That's a bit over the top.
I think what has been suggested is not that re-directing your business to one of the big chains would be some kind of economic travesty, but that it would be a missed opportunity to support those who help provide variety and options not found at the mega stores who buy according to some program and limits consumer choice. It's a move that supports variety and local sourcing. This has been well-articulated in this thread by ahmahler and others.
Now... supporting local business... is the value of that even up for debate at this point?

Once one left the hardware department and entered specialty foods, deli, outdoor, or wine... Andersons did source local products and had hundreds and/or thousands of unique items that will never be found at Wal Mart, Meijer, or Target.

posted by justread on Jan 19, 2017 at 02:26:43 pm     #   2 people liked this

viola posted at 12:59:54 PM on Jan 19, 2017:

Also, I have no love for Kroger, but it's headquartered in Cincinnati, while Meijer's is headquartered even closer to home (Grand Rapids, MI). So patronizing chain stores that ultimately benefit the economies of Michigan and Ohio ... how is that evil?

Many, many things sold at Andersons were made in China, just like similar merchandise in Meijer's and Target and WalMart.

Just sayin'.

FWIW I spent some time at Meijer's headquarters and it appeared to be a good place. They donate quite a bit of money to charities in Michigan and Ohio and the company is still run by the family. All the corporate employees I met really liked working there and they seemed to be treated well. I will also note that personally when Kroger dropped the support for a charity event I was leading a few years ago Meijer jumped in to fill the void very quickly and were very generous.

posted by glasscityguy on Jan 19, 2017 at 02:36:35 pm     #  

Don't know if it is still true today but, in the past, when Meijer put up a store, it was all cash. The company had zero debt.

Also, FWIW, last I knew, White Castle did the same and also was debt free.

posted by Foodie on Jan 19, 2017 at 02:57:14 pm     #  

justread, could you share with me the contact information for a few local store buyers/managers who are receptive to the idea of carrying new merchandise?

I went through a heck of a time in 2010 trying to find a consistent source of good crusty bread that was natural and not made with dough conditioners (see the old "Good Bread" thread). I was trying my best to keep the dollars local and I never encountered anyone who was receptive to some discussion at that time. In fact, retail folks, especially those who were department heads or managers, seemed fairly swamped during their workday and could barely snatch a few minutes to talk to me or to return my phone calls.

I think that store managers are limited to ordering whatever their existing wholesaler already provides. If it's not on the inventory/order list, they're not interested in seeking it out ... and also, they don't have much free time during the workday to have detailed discussions and take notes on a customer's preference.

I used to make the rounds of the independent/local Sofo's, both the Churchill's, the Monnetteses, the three "5-Star" groceries, Country Grains, and also, Meijer's. Between the two, Fresh Market and Costco solved my bread dilemma the day they each opened their doors.

My preference would certainly be to support local stores -- but I came away with the impression that local store buyers/managers don't have the flexibility, or the time, or the power to override the bookkeeper's preference for simplicity in payment streams, or the wholesaler's inertia, or the delivery guy's haphazard approach to providing a consistent supply of something ... even if customers are clamoring for it.

It's great to see that 6 years later, we have MUCH better bread options at the farmer's market, and artisan bakers.

But moving forward, I would very much like to be able to talk to a few folks about picking up some specialty lines or products. If anyone can give me a name or two, I would appreciate it.

posted by viola on Jan 19, 2017 at 05:40:59 pm     #  

The departments I'll miss most about the Anderson's will be the cheese and wine departments. Excellent selection and the guys at the wine department at both stores were wonderful.

posted by classylady on Jan 19, 2017 at 05:52:13 pm     #  

viola posted at 04:40:59 PM on Jan 19, 2017:

justread, could you share with me the contact information for a few local store buyers/managers who are receptive to the idea of carrying new merchandise?

I went through a heck of a time in 2010 trying to find a consistent source of good crusty bread that was natural and not made with dough conditioners (see the old "Good Bread" thread). I was trying my best to keep the dollars local and I never encountered anyone who was receptive to some discussion at that time. In fact, retail folks, especially those who were department heads or managers, seemed fairly swamped during their workday and could barely snatch a few minutes to talk to me or to return my phone calls.

I think that store managers are limited to ordering whatever their existing wholesaler already provides. If it's not on the inventory/order list, they're not interested in seeking it out ... and also, they don't have much free time during the workday to have detailed discussions and take notes on a customer's preference.

I used to make the rounds of the independent/local Sofo's, both the Churchill's, the Monnetteses, the three "5-Star" groceries, Country Grains, and also, Meijer's. Between the two, Fresh Market and Costco solved my bread dilemma the day they each opened their doors.

My preference would certainly be to support local stores -- but I came away with the impression that local store buyers/managers don't have the flexibility, or the time, or the power to override the bookkeeper's preference for simplicity in payment streams, or the wholesaler's inertia, or the delivery guy's haphazard approach to providing a consistent supply of something ... even if customers are clamoring for it.

It's great to see that 6 years later, we have MUCH better bread options at the farmer's market, and artisan bakers.

But moving forward, I would very much like to be able to talk to a few folks about picking up some specialty lines or products. If anyone can give me a name or two, I would appreciate it.

See. No evil. :)

Totally understand. I can't source everything local. And I am certainly no example of the perfect local buyer. But this situation has firmed my resolve to invest the extra time it takes to support any spin offs and have that personal experience you seek. I really think that's the very thing I am trying to "protect." In my small way.
I hope some of those spin offs are some of the talented and knowledgeable people from Andersons. That would be poetic.

I buy Sam's ciabatta. What can you do? I like it.

The Fed Ex truck comes here too. :(

On the issue of contact information, maybe between all of us, we can give leads on folks who might entertain those conversations.

posted by justread on Jan 19, 2017 at 09:08:00 pm     #  

Sautter's and Walt Churchill's Briarfield are excellent at sourcing hard to find products. One caveat-supply chains are funny. Not every store deals with every purveyor. When you find the match, it feels easy to source. If you are looking for something specific, and one store can't seem to get it, it may be a situation where the acquisition would be prohibitively expensive. Typically the larger, independent stores, will have the broadest range of vendors. Large chain stores, specialty or otherwise, tend to keep leverage on a few large suppliers. This circles back on the previously discussed issues with locally curated vs. leveraged selections.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 19, 2017 at 10:16:21 pm     #  

National trends do eventually make their way to Toledo :-)

If I were undertaking the bread search today, as opposed to 2010, I'm sure the grocery folks would have a better level of understanding about unnecessary chemical additives, crust characteristics, etc. Back then, most of them looked at me like I was a Gwyneth-Paltrow-level food crank.

posted by viola on Jan 20, 2017 at 12:39:31 am     #  

http://www.toledoblade.com/Editorials/2017/01/20/Save-The-Andersons.html

posted by upso on Jan 20, 2017 at 08:46:55 am     #  

I read that and I like it a lot. I was going to post something similar.

Instead of permanently closing, why not downsize? Take the most profitable parts of the store and eliminate the others. Cut the square footage of each by 60-70%. Subdivide them, keep as warehouse space, something. That Andersons market didn't work in sylvania, but why not try it in place of the big stores in better, established locations?

I think the stores would both survive and greatly benefit from hiring some marketing and design consultants from outside the company to optimize things and update the look of the place.

Surely it's possible for one last stand. Some jobs at each store could be saved and the legacy could live on.

posted by mixman on Jan 20, 2017 at 10:24:36 am     #  

$20 million losses. Just let that sink in. There is no saving the stores by downsizing or any other means. Bottom line, the Andersons is a business, not a charity. We are lucky they were open this long. The Blade's piece is self-serving. If there are no more Andersons stores, that means no more advertising from one of its biggest advertisers and probably about a $500,000 loss or more in yearly advertising.

posted by westsidebob on Jan 20, 2017 at 10:53:29 am     #   6 people liked this

When they opened the Sylvania marketplace I thought they were going to try downsizing if it was successful. I'm surprised it wasn't a success seeing they carried the items I like to shop at the Andersons for. I always thought they would do great opening up a small store downtown similar to the Walmart neighborhood stores in big cities except carry some higher quality items like a limited selection of their finer cheeses and wines and also carry a couple brands of every day products such as shampoo and laundry soap.

posted by classylady on Jan 20, 2017 at 10:59:18 am     #   1 person liked this

Agree that The Blade's editorial is somewhat self serving. Who
wrote that ?

I Agree that the Anderson's stores have a great wine selection.

But------the writer says " The stores are SAID to have a superb wine collection".
SAID to have ?
That sounds like that is what the writer has "heard" from others.

If so, how can the writer be so passionate about a store he doesn't even know that much about.

posted by foodie88 on Jan 20, 2017 at 11:07:01 am     #   2 people liked this

Even if all those people signed a commitment to shop at the Anderson's who is to say they would honor it? Reminds me of all these celebrity's who said they were moving to Canada if Trump was elected. Whoopie Goldberg was one of them and I saw an ad promoting a new mini-series she will be in and Al Sharpton was protesting a few days ago about something so they obviously have no plans on packing up anytime soon.

I shopped almost every week at the Anderson's and am going to miss them, but I realize it's a done deal and time to find a new place to shop.

Sad thing is the Ann Arbor community is going to benefit due to this from me. For my cheese and olive oil purchases I'll make a monthly run to Zingerman's and while we are up there it is going to mean I'll eat a meal there and also go to Trader Joe and Plum Market.

Now that the Anderson's is history I wish Trader Joe would seriously consider opening up a store here. But on the other hand if a company that has been in the Toledo market for years closes due to support it may be stating the Toledo market doesn't have the demographics for a successful Trader Joe.

posted by classylady on Jan 20, 2017 at 11:22:20 am     #   1 person liked this

Laughable editorial.

posted by clt212 on Jan 20, 2017 at 11:22:40 am     #  

foodie88, good observation on said to have had ...

posted by westsidebob on Jan 20, 2017 at 11:25:17 am     #  

mixman posted at 09:24:36 AM on Jan 20, 2017:

I read that and I like it a lot. I was going to post something similar.

Instead of permanently closing, why not downsize? Take the most profitable parts of the store and eliminate the others. Cut the square footage of each by 60-70%. Subdivide them, keep as warehouse space, something. That Andersons market didn't work in sylvania, but why not try it in place of the big stores in better, established locations?

I think the stores would both survive and greatly benefit from hiring some marketing and design consultants from outside the company to optimize things and update the look of the place.

Surely it's possible for one last stand. Some jobs at each store could be saved and the legacy could live on.

You don't think was analyzed? Also, how would making a smaller facility with more limited items help with the costs from suppliers?

Getting better deals from suppliers is how the big places like Kroger, Walmart, etc. can pass along better prices to consumers. Margins are razor thin in the industry, even for the big places. If The Andersons went small and specialized, they would have to jack up the prices higher than what they were at the general stores. That's what they did in Sylvania and the target market spoke soundly and swiftly there (though I personally loved it when I was visiting).

posted by clt212 on Jan 20, 2017 at 11:28:29 am     #  

The editorial was laughable.

That couldn't have been an easy decision for the Anderson's to make. They stayed in business for a few years after posting sizeable losses, if this was a big box like Walmart losing that kind of cash on a store it would have been closed a long time ago. I'm sure they looked at a lot of possibilities and I wouldn't be surprised if they were trying that with the Marketplace stores and found out that business wasn't a viable option.

The Blade has a big interest in the Anderson's closing seeing all the advertising revenue they get. This is probably going to hit them as hard as when Dillard's took over Lion store.

posted by classylady on Jan 20, 2017 at 11:29:48 am     #   1 person liked this

westsidebob posted at 09:53:29 AM on Jan 20, 2017:

$20 million losses. Just let that sink in. There is no saving the stores by downsizing or any other means. Bottom line, the Andersons is a business, not a charity. We are lucky they were open this long. The Blade's piece is self-serving. If there are no more Andersons stores, that means no more advertising from one of its biggest advertisers and probably about a $500,000 loss or more in yearly advertising.

You have found the solution. Using your figures, 8 years times $500,000 would be $4,000,000.
You can eliminate 20% of the losses simply by not advertising with The Blade. Huh.

posted by justread on Jan 20, 2017 at 11:44:48 am     #   1 person liked this

Ding ding ding

posted by westsidebob on Jan 20, 2017 at 11:45:29 am     #  

Baby, come back, please! I'll change. You know deep down I'm a good person. I never meant to overlook your massive overhead. I'll do more than buy your wine and cheese. I'll buy towels and countertops and UT sweatshirts. Just give me a chance.

posted by TrilbyGuy on Jan 20, 2017 at 12:37:20 pm     #  

JRB is upset that he won't have a place to sucker into making his big block of cheese.

He is also forgetting that The Andersons did try the grocery/meat/wine concept at its Sylvania market. They didn't know how to promote it, or how to make it competitive in a changing market, and as a result, it never fully connected with consumers.

posted by WordsRUs on Jan 20, 2017 at 01:02:07 pm     #   1 person liked this

And kind of hidden away only for Sylvania residents.

posted by westsidebob on Jan 20, 2017 at 01:04:34 pm     #  

westsidebob posted at 12:04:34 PM on Jan 20, 2017:

And kind of hidden away only for Sylvania residents.

More like marketed towards the higher-end buyers that reside in places like Sylvania. If that concept couldn't make a profit in Sylvania, it's not going to make it. IMO.

posted by MsArcher on Jan 20, 2017 at 01:09:10 pm     #   2 people liked this

Negative Nellies.

Someone writes an impassioned piece with ideas on how to save a treasured business, and people shoot it down and nit pick. Don't let an anit-Blade agenda overshadow the sentiment I think most people agree with. We would like Andersons to stay open.

Since everything is out in the open, let's talk numbers. $20 million in losses is not for one year, it's over 8-9 years. That works out to about $2.5 million per year, which works out to an average $625,000 per year per store.

You're telling me a company that does $4,200,000,000.00 (billion with a B) in revenue a year can't effectively restructure a retail business that is costing $2.5 million per year? That strikes me as surprising. I think they gave it one try with the market, in a less-than-ideal location, and then called it quits.

posted by mixman on Jan 20, 2017 at 01:56:17 pm     #  

(All of the above)

a) That editorial was really poorly written, but it had its heart in the right place. Maumee is Not the location that is going to be lost without an Anderson's but west Toledo.

b) Reinventing Anderson's could very well be part of what got them into trouble in the first place. Of the 4 remaining stores 3 are/were very busy. in 2009, there were 6 stores and a grocery store. Of those, Brice Rd (Columbus), Lima and Woodville were excruciatingly slow, and no doubt a suck on the profitability. 2 of those stores closed prior to this year, along with the Grocery only store. The grocery concept never took off, I believe this is for a few reasons. There seems to be this sense, internally, that upper management, had a bit of hubris and lacked curiosity as to what was going on in the market. This was reflected in the store layout, the continued inclusion of House of Meats, and the constant reorganization and resets at the grocery store. They never knew what they had. And the final piece of the "reinventing" is lack of understanding what they were. They were funky, goofy, all purpose store with tons of discoveries, and some very specialized departments (Lawn and Garden & Beer/ Wine). The moment they decided to compete with Meijer/ Wal Mart by adopting Bed Bath and Beyond's design, was throwing good money at a problem they probably didn't have. I know, prior to 2008, they ran pretty close to break even. Maybe a little austerity and focus may helped, we'll never know. I imagine if they had never done a redesign, closed those 3 slow stores and never touched the Grocery Concept, we'd be having a different conversation right now. I do believe that the upper management were their own worst enemy.

c) That said-I do believe a version of Andersons, focusing more on the stuff on the "right" side of the store, could work.

d) What's next? I just returned from a meeting in Columbus, and one of the owners of a large wine distributor in Columbus just told me he had already fielded 2 calls this week asking about counsel regarding picking up the stores in Columbus-They felt personnel was too invalauble. There are sales and there is a clientele. Perhaps they can reorganize as The Blade suggests a la Churchill's family. Perhaps someone will buy them. This idea of committing to shop there is sort of silly. What does the market bear? Is there a "food desert" on Monroe St? Not Really. So, what have we learned about the success and ultimate failure? Can we or anyone replicate the successful pieces, or are we doomed the homogenization route (Toledo is relatively low on the scale, currently).

posted by ahmahler on Jan 20, 2017 at 02:26:41 pm     #   1 person liked this

Or that $2.5 million annually can be put towards expanding a grain elevator operation in Nebraska or a rail facility in Utah or hire 31 new commodities traders at an average salary of $80,000. Something that isn't guaranteed to lose money. They have lots of profitable ventures, so why keep torching money on a losing one? So a city that doesn't financially support the stores can feel good about itself?

That's not being a negative nelly; that's reality.

posted by clt212 on Jan 20, 2017 at 02:58:16 pm     #   6 people liked this

Perhaps retail was not a priority with the upper management. Not worth the effort to compete in the retail market. Customer's shopping habits, stiff competition, national chains, etc have drastically changed the landscape

posted by Hoops on Jan 20, 2017 at 04:21:45 pm     #   1 person liked this

You're telling me a company that does $4,200,000,000.00 (billion with a B) in revenue a year can't effectively restructure a retail business that is costing $2.5 million per year?

Actually... the company is telling you that directly.

posted by justread on Jan 20, 2017 at 04:29:54 pm     #   5 people liked this

Oops. we got our costs (unknown) and losses ($20M per 8 years) mixed up.

posted by justread on Jan 20, 2017 at 04:30:34 pm     #  

Everyone forgets..Andersons is now a big Agri-business. In the 90 and early 2000's retail sales were a significant portion of the business. Grain was primarily focused in Ohio, Michigan and Indiana. Starting mid-2000's..explosive growth. Buying up companies and grain storage across the United States. Expanded into California, Tennessee, Florida..even Mexico. Rail division expanded significantly. Company got heavily into ethanol. Retail became a side note...retail was a bigger piece of the pie 20 years ago. I just don't think Andersons wants to be in the retail business..even if they turned a slight profit. It's not their core business anymore. That is why it was just shut down..no downsizing..no leadership change..no cost cutting..just shut down.

posted by bailey on Jan 20, 2017 at 04:45:21 pm     #   1 person liked this

clt212 posted at 01:58:16 PM on Jan 20, 2017:

Or that $2.5 million annually can be put towards expanding a grain elevator operation in Nebraska or a rail facility in Utah or hire 31 new commodities traders at an average salary of $80,000. Something that isn't guaranteed to lose money. They have lots of profitable ventures, so why keep torching money on a losing one? So a city that doesn't financially support the stores can feel good about itself?

That's not being a negative nelly; that's reality.

Sometimes symbolism, stability, community and the greater good are more important than a publicly traded company's profits, particularly when they can both be achieved.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 20, 2017 at 06:28:21 pm     #  

Nothing is more important than profits, when you have active stockholders who want to break up companies just for the hell of it.

posted by viola on Jan 20, 2017 at 08:17:27 pm     #  

ahmahler posted at 05:28:21 PM on Jan 20, 2017:
clt212 posted at 01:58:16 PM on Jan 20, 2017:

Or that $2.5 million annually can be put towards expanding a grain elevator operation in Nebraska or a rail facility in Utah or hire 31 new commodities traders at an average salary of $80,000. Something that isn't guaranteed to lose money. They have lots of profitable ventures, so why keep torching money on a losing one? So a city that doesn't financially support the stores can feel good about itself?

That's not being a negative nelly; that's reality.

Sometimes symbolism, stability, community and the greater good are more important than a publicly traded company's profits, particularly when they can both be achieved.

Especially when you don't own said company's stock, right?

Tell that to the community who didn't even shop there enough to keep it from losing millions a year.

That said, I loved the Andersons. It was a childhood destination when we rode bikes, the place to go for certain "good" versions of things when I got older and a welcomed nostalgic surprise when I moved to Columbus and learned they were here too. The Talmadge store will always be what comes to mind when I hear "general store." But economic reality is a concept I feel Toledo has failed to grasp; a feeling reinforced when I read that Blade editorial.

posted by Columbusguy on Jan 20, 2017 at 09:25:36 pm     #   2 people liked this

I would love to hear from the folks the LOVED the Andersons on.... why? I have been shopping there for decades and never loved a single thing... while still loving the company and concept.

posted by upso on Jan 21, 2017 at 01:27:13 am     #   1 person liked this

upso posted at 12:27:13 AM on Jan 21, 2017:

I would love to hear from the folks the LOVED the Andersons on.... why? I have been shopping there for decades and never loved a single thing... while still loving the company and concept.

It's the only big box store that I patronize regularly. It's headquartered in Maumee or something like that. Local. The Talmadge Rd store is about a seven-minute drive from our West Toledo house.

I'm not the kind of shopper that will make more than three stops when out. And while I can buy some of the items at my other favorite stores, such as the Phoenix Earth Food Co-op, Zavotski's, Al Habib, Titgemeier's, and Black Diamond, at times, I want to complete my shopping in one stop.

The Andersons is convenient for me. Here are a few simple examples of why The Andersons is unique to my needs.

In the backyard bird feeding section of the store, I can buy Chuck-A-Nut pumpkin seeds that I feed to the birds because House Sparrows don't eat them, and in the beer section, I can buy Orval. I'd like to know of another store that sells those two items.

At The Andersons bakery, I can buy a black-and-white cookie for me, and in the pet section, I can buy dog food for my mutt.

I can buy white whole wheat flour for bread baking and green bean seeds to plant in my garden. I can buy light bulbs for the track lightning in my computer room and Cheerwine soda.

I can buy the usual things, such as toothpaste, deodorant, shampoo, trash bags, paper goods, cleaning supplies, snacks, wine, and if necessary, house paint, work gloves, nails, a new lawn or garden tool, tomato plants for my garden, and Espoma organic fertilizers.

That quirky variety is what attracted me. But that variety might also be the reason why the store failed because shoppers like me probably represent a minority.

Without The Andersons, I'm confident that between Amazon.com and my favorite small, locally-owned stores that I will be able to satisfy my shopping needs, although it will be less convenient.

The main concern, however, will be where to buy the black-and-white cookie. I might have to learn to bake that myself.

posted by jr on Jan 21, 2017 at 06:13:04 am     #   3 people liked this

I just need to clarify, so that this discussion stays on point, that the Blade article was proposing a separate group of investors, preferably involving a family member, restart the retail business focused on the sectors that worked for them: beer and wine, cheese, etc. More specialty items. So this would have nothing to do with the current publicly traded company, so no concern about how it gels with the concern of the stockholder who bought into a grain logistics company.

posted by Johio83 on Jan 21, 2017 at 10:03:06 am     #  

Excerpts from the Jan 22, 2017 Blade story

Chairman Emeritus Dick Anderson said the company tried multiple strategies through the years to bolster its stores. None worked.

“Every time we’d spend a million on an upgrade, the customer count and average sale would slip,” he said. “Pretty darn discouraging.”

Dick Anderson said the stores were problematic for a decade but the company was reluctant to close them even knowing it likely couldn’t compete with Lowe’s, Home Depot, Wal-Mart, and others.

“Those guys had us before we opened the door,” he said. “All we were looking for at the end of the day was like 2 percent [profit margin], which just wasn’t there.”

“Then it became, ‘Wow, this is a community service; we’ve got all these jobs to protect.’ And we struggled with that for the last 10 years or so and being a public [stock] company, the pressure began to build more and more and we’d get sharp questions [from Wall Street investors] about when are we going to deal with that?” he said.

Chris Boring, a Columbus retail consultant, said The Andersons’ two stores in Ohio’s capital “had a cult following in Columbus,” he said, adding that wealthy suburbanites loved going there for wine, gourmet foods, and garden supplies.

“Their merchandise mix really doesn’t seem to have any rhyme or reason — but the suburbanites liked that,” the consultant said.

Pat Huddleston, a professor of retailing at Michigan State University, said The Andersons carries a breadth of merchandise not unlike Meijer. But, “With only four stores, it’s definitely hard for them to get economy of scale deals from vendors. And that’s just one strike against them,” she said.

“Another is, food tends to be a low-margin business. You’re talking 2 to 3 percent margins. Then, because they’re small but carry such a breadth of merchandise, that’s a third strike against them in the current [retail] environment,” she said.

Kelli Hollinger, director of the Center for Retailing Studies at Texas A&M University, said small general merchandisers such as The Andersons have faced a growing disadvantage for some time now against retail behemoths like Wal-Mart and Target.

And now Amazon.com is the biggest threat yet.

Some consumers and employees have suggested the company should retreat to a single store again as it began in 1952. But Mr. Boring said that’s an impossible task because resources — credit-card charges, point-of-sale systems, security, inventory, stocking, and more — are more expensive with one store than with four, making it financially unfeasible.

“One store would absorb all the costs, that is, the overhead of four stores. If it’s not profitable with four stores, there’s no way it could be profitable with one store,” Mr. Boring said. “It probably seems counter-intuitive to the average person who shops there, but that’s the way retail is.”

Mr. Boring said The Andersons “are a unique animal among retailers ... but always was a throwback to the old days,” he said. “I’m kind of surprised they didn’t close them earlier,” he added.

posted by jr on Jan 22, 2017 at 09:25:10 pm     #  

restart the retail business focused on the sectors that worked for them: beer and wine, cheese, etc. More specialty items.

But how does anyone (but them) know what worked for them? What was throwing a profit? What were the real money losers? Obviously they had a positive gross margin (revenue less cost of goods sold), otherwise their losses would have been much higher. Which means it was the other expenses needed to operate - from cashiers to inventory clerks to utilities, etc. Figuring out what was giving the higher gross margin, so that enough was left over to cover selling, general and administrative expenses is probably a pretty easy report to pull. But figuring out if those items can actually attract enough customers, and can be sourced affordably is the real question.

All I'm saying is we can think the wine and cheese was a good seller for them, but we have no way of knowing.

posted by MsArcher on Jan 22, 2017 at 11:27:18 pm     #  

Well, I can tell you that the state of Ohio mandates minimum markups on beer and wine. Beer is 25% gross profit and wine is 33%. Andersons Talmadge may have hit $3-4 million in beer and wine and Maumee was pushing $3 million respectively. Plenty of gross profit in those arenas, with minimal waste.

posted by ahmahler on Jan 23, 2017 at 08:56:21 am     #  

^ Those figures are sales, not profits

posted by ahmahler on Jan 23, 2017 at 09:30:39 am     #  

I don't understand why the Anderson's is still advertising so heavily if they are closing shop. Do they have a contract with the Blade?

posted by classylady on Jan 23, 2017 at 09:56:33 am     #  

classylady posted at 08:56:33 AM on Jan 23, 2017:

I don't understand why the Anderson's is still advertising so heavily if they are closing shop. Do they have a contract with the Blade?

They will come in way under the advertising budget that was set and approved last fall. A lot of advertising comes in the form of packages that are bought in advance and flighted or run according to a pre-determined schedule.

posted by justread on Jan 23, 2017 at 10:05:02 am     #   1 person liked this

They probably bought 1st qtr last year. But they will still need to advertise so long as they are open. Just not to the extent they are now.

posted by Molsonator on Jan 23, 2017 at 11:20:45 am     #  

I see them running clearance ads second quarter to get the last of the stock out.

posted by justread on Jan 23, 2017 at 12:00:38 pm     #  

Then comes the 1/2 time show and after that :{ so solly charlie nothing gets put on the board in the final two.

posted by Mariner on Jan 23, 2017 at 12:28:38 pm     #  

So now where for quality dog food? It was better than the pet stores there. Amazon?

Also, any equivalent beer/wine selections in the area?

posted by thomas on Jan 23, 2017 at 04:26:14 pm     #  

thomas posted at 03:26:14 PM on Jan 23, 2017:

So now where for quality dog food? It was better than the pet stores there. Amazon?

Also, any equivalent beer/wine selections in the area?

I can buy the same dry and canned dog food at amazon.com that I have purchased for years at The Andersons.

For beer, I'll probably shop at Marino's Beverage Depot, Joseph's Beverage Center, and Flick's Package Liquor. Marino's has a nice Belgian-style beer selection.

posted by jr on Jan 23, 2017 at 04:45:23 pm     #   2 people liked this

Marino's Beverage Depot or Joseph's beverage center for booze.
Right next door to Joseph's is a pet shop that has a LOT of quality dog food options. Fresh Thyme Market on Monroe also has some fancy dog food options.

posted by upso on Jan 23, 2017 at 04:45:26 pm     #   1 person liked this

The wife of the owner of Alternative Plumbing on Summit St. in Point Place - actually, their location is just over the line (by literally a few feet) in MI - is very passionate about pet foods and has a very large selection of premium dog and cat foods.
She has her business, Happy Pet, in a section of their building on Summit.
On a smaller scale, the relatively new Three Dog Bakery on Monroe St. also has some premium dog foods.

posted by Foodie on Jan 23, 2017 at 05:07:31 pm     #  

Jr, Fresh Market had black-and-white cookies on Saturday. :-)

posted by suz on Jan 23, 2017 at 05:17:55 pm     #   1 person liked this

Is there any place else in Toledo that sell Donkey Chips. Those are the best bagged nacho chips I've had and I've only seen them at the Anderson's.

posted by classylady on Jan 24, 2017 at 02:11:32 am     #  

thomas posted at 03:26:14 PM on Jan 23, 2017:

So now where for quality dog food? It was better than the pet stores there. Amazon?

Also, any equivalent beer/wine selections in the area?

I've heard that TSC (Tractor Supply Company) carries many premium brands of dog food. I don't know what specific brand you use, but here's a link to the dog food section of their website:
http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/catalog/dog-food-treats

There is a TSC in Sylvania Twp, on Central Ave a little west of Meijer. There may be other locations in the metro area, I'm not really sure.

posted by mom2 on Jan 24, 2017 at 07:47:48 am     #   1 person liked this

classylady posted at 01:11:32 AM on Jan 24, 2017:

Is there any place else in Toledo that sell Donkey Chips. Those are the best bagged nacho chips I've had and I've only seen them at the Anderson's.

Yep. Fresh Thyme. And, when I was there Saturday am, they were on sale for $1.88/bag which is a terrific sale price. There was a large display of them on the right as you walk in the door.

Prior to Andersons carrying them, I could only find them in stores in the Detroit Metro area

posted by Foodie on Jan 24, 2017 at 09:58:29 am     #  

Thx! $1.88 is a terrific price for Donkey Chips. Hopefully they are still on sale this weekend when I can get out there

posted by classylady on Jan 24, 2017 at 10:46:29 am     #  

Anyone know who the Anderson's uses for their private label coffee? They have a Peanut Butter cup coffee that I love and the Anderson's is the only place I can find it at. If I can at least find out who the roaster is I'm hoping I can find another retailer that has it on their website to mail order it.

I never knew the Anderson's carried Donkey Chips's until reading this thread. I discovered their salsa at Fresh Thyme when the store opened and it's one of the best jarred salsas I've had

posted by jamesteroh on Jan 30, 2017 at 04:40:45 pm     #  

I'll have to try the chips again. Tried them a while back and everyone in house gave them a "meh"...

posted by SensorG on Jan 30, 2017 at 04:44:30 pm     #  

As some of us figured would happen. Good news I'd say - but, IMHO, stay away from the former Andersons Market store. I don't see that as a location that would work for Churchill's.

posted by Foodie on Apr 11, 2017 at 09:01:15 am     #  

Interesting that the speculation is on West Toledo and Sylvania. Both locations that had Anderson's and Churchill's close.

posted by JoeyGee on Apr 11, 2017 at 12:56:34 pm     #  

The West Toledo location's closing had nothing to do with the performance of the store, which was outstanding. It was tax problems at other properties.

http://www.toledoblade.com/Retail/2012/08/28/Longtime-Toledo-Churchills-store-to-close.html

posted by westsidebob on Apr 11, 2017 at 01:36:44 pm     #  

Also, the Central Avenue Churchill's Supermarket store was the last of the Churchill's stores. These were owned by a trust in the name of the late General Walter A. Churchill.

Walt Churchill operates his own stores. They are called Walt Churchill's Market.

So the closing of the west Toledo store also had nothing to do with Walt, it would appear.

posted by justread on Apr 11, 2017 at 02:08:06 pm     #  

Correct-think of if as 2 totally different companies. Walt Churchill's competes at the higher end segment. He is the last member of the family in the business.

posted by ahmahler on Apr 11, 2017 at 02:33:43 pm     #  

It's looking like the Maumee Churchills is expanding their wine section to pull in some of the Andersons customers. What don't understand is, instead of expanding their craft beer section, I'm seeing more Miller and Coors on the sales floor; makes no sense to me. The beer guy there is really knowledgeable, but I haven't had time to ask him what's going on.

posted by SensorG on Apr 11, 2017 at 04:10:17 pm     #  

If anyone here finds out where the older guy in the wine department of the Talmadge store ends up, please post it. He's been really helpful.

The Anderson has posted a website to buy their private label coffee at. http://schuilcoffee.com/

Their prices are a little cheaper than the Anderson's but not sure how shipping is

posted by jamesteroh on Apr 11, 2017 at 09:43:27 pm     #  

If anyone here finds out where the older guy in the wine department of the Talmadge store ends up, please post it. He's been really helpful.

I'll let you know, when he decides what comes next-The gentleman you're thinking of is Jim, and he's one of the most patient and professional people I've ever met in my career. A true star in this business. He ran that wine department for about 25 years. If I recall, he is only the second wine manager in the store's history, and took over very shortly after the store opened (within a year or 2). He also wrote a book (unpublished) about beer, 15 years ago.

posted by ahmahler on Apr 11, 2017 at 10:19:48 pm     #   1 person liked this

Both Jim and Dave (beer) will be sorely missed, that's for sure.

posted by webrioter on Apr 12, 2017 at 07:20:06 am     #  

Does Jim still have his Friday afternoon confab with Scott Sands on WSPD?

posted by Foodie on Apr 12, 2017 at 08:36:45 am     #  

Foodie posted at 08:36:45 AM on Apr 12, 2017:

Does Jim still have his Friday afternoon confab with Scott Sands on WSPD?

Good question-I'm not sure.

posted by ahmahler on Apr 12, 2017 at 09:08:47 am     #  

The Former Anderson's on Talmadge has been listed for sale at a PP of $7.5M.

posted by mk123 on Apr 12, 2017 at 09:28:59 am     #  

At that price, I can't imagine anyone other than a big box type grocer or retailer being the buyer. With Kroger building a new store down the road and big box retailers already on the ropes, I'd guess that will sit there for a while.

posted by Foodie on Apr 12, 2017 at 11:13:02 am     #  

The rent in that area, generally, is insane. I recall hearing that when Claudia's was open on Monroe street that they were paying something like 30k a month...

posted by upso on Apr 12, 2017 at 11:54:27 am     #  

That's a huge parcel and arguably one of the best locations for retail in Toledo. The price doesn't surprise me.

posted by slowsol on Apr 12, 2017 at 12:07:00 pm     #  

I'm shocked that ProMedica has not purchased the property already. It seems like a good location for a wellness water slide park that uses essential oils.

posted by jr on Apr 12, 2017 at 12:22:18 pm     #   4 people liked this

jr posted at 12:22:18 PM on Apr 12, 2017:

I'm shocked that ProMedica has not purchased the property already. It seems like a good location for a wellness water slide park that uses essential oils.

The Ebeid Center for Essential Water Wellness.

posted by justread on Apr 12, 2017 at 02:13:30 pm     #   2 people liked this

jr posted at 12:22:18 PM on Apr 12, 2017:

I'm shocked that ProMedica has not purchased the property already. It seems like a good location for a wellness water slide park that uses essential oils.

They could put so many neon lights at Monroe and Talmadge it would look like the green version of Lewis as Alexis.

posted by JoeyGee on Apr 12, 2017 at 02:55:15 pm     #  

I have an idea. How bout we pt a driving range there? Par 3 sounds like a good name. At 7.5 mil. though, people would have to hit a lot of $3 buckets of balls. Also, some clown might slice the ball and hit cars on Talmadge. So, we'd have to do some risk calculations. Teenage boys?

posted by paulhem on Apr 12, 2017 at 08:25:00 pm     #  

pt = put

posted by paulhem on Apr 12, 2017 at 08:25:25 pm     #  

PH2 is getting an offer together for the city to purchase the property for 8.2 mil. They have a plan.

posted by marving on Apr 13, 2017 at 02:07:28 am     #   5 people liked this

Why, yes - yes "they" do - the city wants to make it suitable for Jeep to park the Cherokees there.

posted by Foodie on Apr 13, 2017 at 08:38:44 am     #   1 person liked this

Foodie posted at 08:38:44 AM on Apr 13, 2017:

Why, yes - yes "they" do - the city wants to make it suitable for Jeep to park the Cherokees there.

Somebody's cousin probably knows a guy who can demolish it at significant tax payer cost.

posted by justread on Apr 13, 2017 at 09:05:00 am     #  

"... can demolish it ..."

Has the Blade editorial board approved the demolition of the old building?

What about the six trees on that property? I've always enjoyed the green space when shopping at The Andersons. I would hate for the new owner to upset the deranged social media mob.

Molsonator normally has a good guess for what will open at a new location.

posted by jr on Apr 13, 2017 at 09:25:36 am     #   1 person liked this